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Bird Observatories in Michigan


Holiday Beach Migration Observatory

Bob Petit, President; (313)379-4558
US. Inquiries: Fred McDonald,
220 Channing St., Ferndale, MI 48220
Canadian Inquiries: Hank Hunt,
1938 Buckingham, Windsor, ONN8T2BJ

E-MAIL/WEB SITE: raptor@wehbernet.net; www.wincom.net
~ Study of Fall raptor migration at Holiday Beach Conservation Area in Essex County of Southwestern Ontario. Migrant birds are readily observed here as they skirt the north shore of Lake Erie before crossing the Detroit River and dis-persing to the south and west.


Rouge River Bird Observatory

Natural Areas Dept., 4901 Evergreen Rd.,
Dearborn, MI 48128
Julie Craves, (313) 593-5338

E-MAIL/WEB SITE: jcraves@umd.umich.edu; www.rrbo.org
~ RRBO is located in 300 acres of remnant habitat surrounded by urban areas, in the hometown of Henry Ford. The focus is on stopover ecology of migrant birds, and the importance of urban natural areas to birds.
~ 250 species were recorded in 1999. The number of species recorded at this site is 60% of all known species in MI.


Whitefish Point Bird Observatory

16914 N Whitefish Point Rd. Paradise, MI 49768
Jeannette Morss, (906)492-3596

E-MAIL/WEB SITE: warbler@up.net, www.wpbo.org
~ Land and water features create a natural corridor, funneling thousands of migrating birds to the Point.
~ Early spring migration includes Bald Eagles and Northern Goshawks, followed by 15,000 to 25,000 other raptors; Sharp Shinned Hawks and Broad-wings being the most common.
~ Fall migration brings 50- to 100,000 waterbirds, including thousands of loons, grebes, geese and ducks. Many rarities are spotted each season, including an occasional jaeger or unusual gull.

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